Timeless Principles that Every Starting Commercial Photographer should Know about

July 21, 2013  •  Leave a Comment
Many times, when clients are looking for photography services, they first try to determine the level of professionalism and expertise that they want for their shoot. Certainly, one has to draw a line between the amateur photographers and working professionals, and we’ve concluded that the difference lies more in business decisions rather than the expensive equipment or even the talent himself/herself. Here are timeless principles for starting commercial photographers who are breaking into the commercial magazine photography.
  • Be on time with everything

Bad things will happen when you miss deadlines. There will always be bad consequences for being tardy. The magazine will lose money. The editor will get in trouble. YOU WILL NEVER BE HIRED AGAIN. So it’s essential that you don’t miss a single deadline.

  • Invest in the right equipment

In recent, most professionals prefer digital SLR cameras, but it is at the cost of a high price. However, understand that your biggest focus on investment should be your lens. A good lens means everything in getting the right shot. It’s not just the amount of zoom you have or how wide it can get, but the quality of the glass, the maximum size of the aperture, and other characteristics.

In the end, your lenses dictate what type of shots you can take. Indoor shots, outdoor shots, close-up shots, landscape shots, daytime shots, and nighttime shots are made only because of your lens.

  • Build an archive

Deadlines can be so intricate to work with, especially when time is not an ally. One way to make it easier is to build up an archive of photos that you can fall back on. Being able to directly satisfy an editor with a collection of photos that fit his tasks will put you ahead.

  • Be visible, get noticed

Take the time to build a brilliant portfolio on the Internet. Utilize social media to advertise both your brand and your work. Represent yourself well by using good grammar in all situations. Make time to participate in online forums if you have the time and reach out to your fellow photographers. Do your best to be visible and noticeable.

  • Accept the sacrifice of limitations

When providing services for a magazine, you will have assignments and tasks designated to you. Basically, this will limit your creative license as a photographer. Even when you’re working with deadlines, you will have to submit to the client and produce the photos that they want to see. I’m not saying that you disregard your own professional advice. Just don’t step in and tell your client that their vision is not the best.


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